Scientology The Selling of a Church 1

 The Selling of a Church Scientology

Church Markets Its Gospel with High-Pressure Sales

(Monday, 25 June 1990, page A1:1)


Behind the religious trappings, the Church of Scientology is run like a lean, no-nonsense business in which potential members are called “prospects,” “raw meat” and “bodies in the shop.”

Its governing financial policy, written by the late Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard, is simple and direct: “MAKE MONEY, MAKE MORE MONEY, MAKE OTHERS PRODUCE SO AS TO MAKE MONEY.”

The organization uses sophisticated sales tactics to sell a seemingly endless progression of expensive courses, each serving as a prerequisite for the next. Known collectively as “The Bridge,” the courses promise salvation, higher intelligence, superhuman powers and even possible survival from nuclear fallout — for those who can pay.

Church tenets mandate that parishioners purchase Scientology goods and services under Hubbard’s “doctrine of exchange.” A person must learn to give, he said, as well as receive.

For its programs and books, the church charges “fixed donations” that range from $50 for an elementary course in improving communication skills to more than $13,000 for Hubbard’s secret teachings on the origins of the universe and the genesis of mankind’s ills.

The church currently is offering a “limited time only” deal on a select package of Hubbard courses, which represent a small portion of The Bridge. If bought individually, those courses would cost $55,455. The sale price: $33,399.50.

As a promotional flyer for the discount observes, “YOU SAVE $22,055.50.”

To complete Hubbard’s progression of courses, a Scientologist could conceivably spend a lifetime and more than $400,000. Although few if any have doled out that much, the high cost of enlightenment in Scientology has left many deeply in debt to family, friends and banks.

Ask former church member Marie Culloden of Manhattan Beach, who describes herself as a “recovering Scientologist.”

“I’m trying to recover my mortgaged home,” says Culloden, who spent 20 years in Scientology and obtained three mortgages totaling more than $80,000 to buy courses.

The Scientology Bridge is always under construction, keeping the Supreme Answer one step away from church members — a potent sales strategy devised by Hubbard to keep the money flowing, critics contend.

New courses continually are added, each of which is said to be crucial for spiritual progress, each heavily promoted.

Church members are warned that unless they keep purchasing Scientology services, misery and sickness may befall them. For the true believer, this is a powerful incentive to keep buying whatever the group is selling.

Through the mail, Scientologists are bombarded with glossy, colorful brochures announcing the latest courses and discounts. Letters and postcards sound the dire warning, “Urgent! Urgent! Your future is at risk! … It is time to ACT! NOW! … You must buy now!”

By far the most expensive service offered by Scientology is “auditing” — a kind of confessional during which an individual reveals intimate and traumatic details of his life while his responses are monitored on a lie detector-type device known as the E-meter.

The purpose is to unburden a person of painful experiences, or “engrams,” that block his spiritual growth, a process that can span hundreds of hours. Auditing is purchased in 12 1/2-hour chunks costing anywhere between $3,000 and $11,000 each, depending on where it is bought.

Even Scientology’s critics concede that auditing often helps people feel better by allowing them to air troubling aspects of their lives — much like a Catholic confessional or psychotherapy — and keeps them coming back for more.

The church makes no apologies for the methods it uses to raise funds and spread the gospel of its founder. Scientology spokesmen said in interviews that it takes money to cover overhead expenses and to finance the church’s worldwide expansion, as it does for any religion.

“You can’t do it on bread and butter,” said one.

Church leaders will not discuss Scientology’s gross income or net worth. But they contend that Scientologists who pay for spiritual programs are no different from, say, Mormons who tithe 10% of their income for admittance to the temple, or from Jews who buy tickets to High Holiday services or from Christians who rent church pews.

“The fact of the matter is that the parishioners of the Church of Scientology have felt and continue to feel that they get full value for their donations,” said Scientology lawyer Earle C. Cooley.

Many Scientologists say that Hubbard’s teachings have resurrected their lives, some of which were marred by drugs, personal traumas, self doubts or a sense of alienation. They say that, through the church, they have gained confidence and learned to lead ethical lives and take responsibility for themselves, while working to create a better world.

Scientology “works,” they say, and for that, no price is too high.

“It takes money,” acknowledged Scientologist Sheri Scott. “It took money for my father to buy his Cadillac. I wish he’d sell the damn thing and give me the money (for Scientology)…. I have never felt cheated at all.”

“I’m not glued to the sky or anything. I’m a very normal person,” she added. “I just wish more people would take a look, would read (about Scientology), before they decide we’re cuckoo.”

While other religions increasingly advertise and market themselves, none approaches the Church of Scientology’s commercial zeal and sophistication.

Its tactics come directly from Hubbard, who wrote entire treatises on how to create a market for, and sell, Scientology.

He borrowed generously from a 1971 book called “Big League Sales Closing Techniques.” Touted as the “selling secrets of a supersalesman,” the book was written by former car dealer Les Dane, who has conducted popular seminars at Scientology headquarters in Florida.

Hubbard said Scientology must be marketed through the “art of hard sell,” meaning an “insistence that people buy.” He said that, “regardless of who the person is or what he is, the motto is, ‘Always sell something….’ ”

Hubbard contended that such high-pressure tactics are imperative because a person’s spiritual well being is at stake.

Among other things, he directed his followers to: “rob the person of every opportunity to say ‘No.’ “; “help prospects work through financial stops impeding a sale”; “make the prospect think it was his idea to make the purchase”; utilize the two man “tag team” approach, and “overcome and rapidly handle any attempted prospect backout.”

One of the most important techniques in selling Scientology, Hubbard said, is to create mystery.

“If we tell him there is something to know and don’t tell him what it is, we will zip people into” the organization, Hubbard wrote. “And one can keep doing this to a person — shuttle them along using mystery.”

Frequently, a person’s first contact with Scientology comes when he is approached by a staff member on the street and offered a free personality test, or receives a lengthy questionnaire in the mail.

Using charts and graphs, the idea is to convince a person that he has some problem, or “ruin,” that Scientology can fix, while assuaging concerns he may have about the church. According to Hubbard, “if the job has been done well, the person should be worried.”

With that accomplished, the customer is pushed to buy services he is told will improve his sorry condition and perhaps give him such powers as being able to spiritually travel outside his body — or, in Scientology jargon, to “exteriorize.”

Former church member Andrew Lesco said he was told that he “would be able to project my mind into drawers, someone’s pocket, a wallet and I would be able to tell what’s inside … ”

Church members are required to write testimonials — “success stories” — as they progress from one level to the next.

The testimonials regularly appear in Scientology publications. Usually carrying only the authors’ initials, they are used to promote courses without the church itself assuming legal liability for promising results that may not occur, according to ex-Scientologists. Here is an example:

We were having trouble with the windshield wipers in our car. Sometimes they would work and sometimes they wouldn’t…. We were driving along, and my husband was driving. I got to thinking about the windshield wipers, left my body in the seat and took a look under the hood. I spotted the wires that were shorting and caused them to weld themselves together, like they were supposed to be. We haven’t had any trouble with them since.

Scientology staffers who sell Hubbard’s courses are called “registrars.”

They earn commissions on their sales and are skilled at eliciting every facet of an individual’s finances, including bank accounts, stocks, cars, houses, whatever can be converted to cash.

Like all Scientology staffers, a registrar’s productivity is evaluated each week. Performance is judged by how much money he or she brings in by Thursday afternoon. And, in Scientology, declining or stagnant productivity is not viewed benevolently, as former registrar Roger Barnes says he learned.

“I remember being dragged across a desk by my tie because I hadn’t made my (sales quota),” said Barnes, who once toured the world selling Scientology until he had a bitter break with the group.

Barnes and other ex-Scientologists say that this uncompromising push to generate more money each week places intense pressure on registrars.

Another former Scientology salesman in Los Angeles said he and other registrars would use a tactic called “crush regging.” The technique, he said, employed no elaborate sales talk. They repeated three words again and again: “Sign the check. Sign the check.”

“This made the person feel so harassed,” he said, “that he would sign the check because it was the only way he was going to get out of there.”

A 1984 investigative report by Canadian authorities quoted a Toronto registrar as saying that members of the public want to be “bled of their money…. If they didn’t, they would be staff members eligible for free training.”

The Canadian report also recounted a meeting during which Scientology staffers chanted: “Go for the throat. Go for blood. Go for the bloody throat.”

Former Scientologist Donna Day of Ventura said that church registrars accused her of throwing away money on rent and on food for her cats and dogs — “degraded beings,” they called her pets. They said the money should be going to the church.

“I was so upset, I finally left the house with them sitting in it,” said Day, who sued the church to get back $25,000 she said she had spent on Scientology.

Several years ago, church members persuaded a Florida woman to turn over a workers compensation settlement she received after the death of her husband, Larry M. Wheaton, who left behind two children, ages 3 and 7. He was the pilot of an Air Florida jet that plunged into the Potomac River after it had departed Washington, D.C.’s National Airport in 1982.

The Wheatons were longtime church members.

Joanne Wheaton gave nearly $150,000 to the church and almost as much to a private business controlled by Scientologists. But the deal was blocked when a lawsuit was brought by an attorney appointed by the court to protect the children’s interests.

The suit claimed that the Scientologists had disregarded the future welfare and financial security of the Wheaton family by taking money that was supposed to be used solely for the support of the children and their mother.

After protracted discussions, the money was refunded and the Scientologists who negotiated the deal were expelled by the church for their role in the affair.

For years, one of Scientology’s top promoters was Larry Wollersheim. He traveled the country inspiring others to follow him across Hubbard’s Bridge. Then he became disenchanted with the movement.

In 1980, he filed a Los Angeles Superior Court lawsuit, accusing the church of subjecting him to psychologically damaging practices and of driving him to the brink of insanity and financial ruin after he had a falling out with the group.

Three years ago, a jury awarded him $30 million. The award was recently reduced to $2.5 million.

During the litigation, Wollersheim filed a 200-page affidavit in which he offered this analysis of what keeps Scientologists hooked:

“Fear and hope are totally indoctrinated into the cult (Scientology) member. He hopes that he will receive the miraculous and ridiculous claims made directly, indirectly and by rumor by the sect and its members.

“He is afraid of the peer pressure for not proceeding up the prescribed program. He is intimidated and afraid of being accused of being a dilettante. He is afraid that if he doesn’t do it now before the world ends or collapses he may never get the chance. He is afraid if he doesn’t claim he received gains and write a success testimonial he will be shunned….

“How many people could stand up to that kind of pressure and stand before a group of applauding people and say: ‘Hey, it really wasn’t good.’?”

Wollersheim said that the courses provide only a temporary euphoria.

“Then you’re sold the next mystery and the next solution…. I’ve seen people sell their homes, stocks, inheritances and everything they own chasing their hopes for a fleeting, subjective euphoria. I have never witnessed a greater preying on the hopes and fears of others that has been carefully engineered by the cult’s leader.”

L Ron HubbardL-Ron-Hubbard-LRH-SCientology

 

Scientology Aftermath Leah Remini

Should Scientology Qualify for Tax Exemption?

 

Advertisements

Scientology The Selling of a Church 2

The Selling of a Church Scientology

Shoring Up Its Religious Profile

The church has adopted the terminology and trappings of traditional theologies. But the IRS is not convinced.

(Monday, 25 June 1990, page A18:1)


Since its founding some 35 years ago by the late science fiction writer L. Ron Hubbard, Scientology has worked hard to shore up its religious profile for the public, the courts and the Internal Revenue Service.

In the old days, for example, those who purchased Hubbard’s Scientology courses were called “students.” Today, they are “parishioners.”

The group’s “franchises” have become “missions.” And Hubbard’s teachings, formerly his “courses,” now are described as sacred scriptures.

The word “Dianetics” was even redefined to give it a spiritual twist. For years, Hubbard said it meant “through the mind.” The new definition: “through the soul.”

Canadian authorities learned firsthand how far Scientologists would go to maintain a religious aura.

According to police documents disclosed in 1984, an undercover officer who infiltrated Scientology’s Toronto outpost during an investigation of its activities was asked by a church official to don a “white collar so that someone in the (organization) looked like a minister.”

For three decades, critics have accused Scientology of assuming the mantle of religion to shield itself from government inquiries and taxes.

“To some, this seems mere opportunism,” Hubbard said of Scientology’s religious conversion in a 1954 communique to his followers. “To some it would seem that Scientology is simply making itself bulletproof in the eyes of the law….”

But, Hubbard insisted, religion is “basically a philosophic teaching designed to better the civilization into which it is taught…. A Scientologist has a better right to call himself a priest, a minister, a missionary, a doctor of divinity, a faith healer or a preacher than any other man who bears the insignia of religion of the Western World.”

Joseph Yanny, a Los Angeles attorney who represented the church until he had a bitter falling out with the group in 1987, said Scientology portrays itself as a religion only where it is expedient to do so — such as in the U.S., where tax laws favor religious organizations.

In Israel and many parts of Latin America, where there is either a state religion or a prohibition against religious organizations owning property, Yanny said Scientology claims to be a philosophical society.

In the beginning, Hubbard toyed with different ways to promote his creation.

For a time, he called it “the only successfully validated psychotherapy in the world.” To those who completed his courses, he offered “certification” as a “Freudian psychoanalyst.”

He also described it as a “precision science” that required no faith or beliefs to produce “completely predictable results” of higher intelligence and better health. Hubbard bestowed upon its practitioners the title “doctor of Scientology.”

This characterization, however, landed him in trouble with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and a federal judge, who concluded in 1971 that Hubbard was making false medical claims and had employed “skillful propaganda to make Scientology … attractive in many varied, often inconsistent wrappings.”

The judge said, however, that if claims about Scientology were advanced in a purely spiritual context, they would be beyond the government’s reach because of protections afforded religions under the First Amendment.

In the United States, it is easy to become a church, no matter how unconventional — you just say it is so. The hard part may come in keeping tax-exempt status, as Scientology has learned.

The U.S. government is constitutionally barred from determining what is and what is not a religion. But, under the law, there is no guaranteed right to tax exemption. The IRS can make a church pay taxes if it fails to meet criteria established by the agency.

A tax-exempt religion may not, for example, operate primarily for business purposes, commit crimes, engage in partisan politics or enrich private individuals. It should, among other things, have a formal doctrine, ordained ministers, religious services, sincerely held beliefs and an established place of worship.

In 1967, the Church of Scientology of California was stripped of its tax-exempt status by the IRS, an action the church considered unlawful and thus ignored. The IRS, in turn, undertook a mammoth audit of the church for the years 1970 through 1974.

So began Scientology’s most sweeping religious make-over.

Among other things, Scientology ministers (formerly “counselors”) started to wear white collars, dark suits and silver crosses.

Sunday services were mandated and chapels were ordered erected in Scientology buildings. It was made a punishable offense for a staffer to omit from church literature the notation that Scientology is a “religious philosophy.”

Many of the changes flowed from a flurry of “religious image” directives issued by high-level Scientology executives. One policy put it bluntly:

“Visual evidences that Scientology is a religion are mandatory.”

None of this, however, convinced the IRS, which assessed the church more than $1 million in back taxes for the years 1970 through 1972.

Scientology appealed to the U.S. Tax Court, where, in 1984, it was handed one of the worst financial and public relations disasters in its history.

In a blistering opinion, the court backed the IRS and said the Church of Scientology of California had “made a business out of selling religion,” had diverted millions of dollars to Hubbard and his family and had “conspired for almost a decade to defraud the United States Government by impeding the IRS.”

The church lost again when it took the case before the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco and the U.S. Supreme Court let the lower-court decision stand.

Stripped of its tax-exempt status, Scientology executives turned the Church of Scientology of California into a virtual shell.

Once called the “Mother Church,” it no longer controls the Scientology empire and does not serve as the chief depository for church funds.

It has been replaced by a number of new organizations that Scientology executives maintain are religious and tax exempt. But, once again, the IRS has disagreed, ruling that the new organizations are still operating in a commercial manner.

Scientology is appealing the IRS decision in the courts.

L Ron Hubbard
Lafayette Ronald Hubbard

If You’re a Scientologist, be Proud!

Did Charles Manson get a Scientology hate website?

 

 

Scientology The Selling of a Church 3

The Selling of a Church

The Courting of Celebrities

Testimonials of the famous are prominent in the church’s push for acceptability. John Travolta and Kirstie Alley are the current headliners.

(Monday, 25 June 1990, page A18:5)


The Church of Scientology uses celebrity spokesmen to endorse L. Ron Hubbard’s teachings and give Scientology greater acceptability in mainstream America.

As far back as 1955, Hubbard recognized the value of famous people to his fledgling, off-beat church when he inaugurated “Project Celebrity.” According to Hubbard, Scientologists should target prominent individuals as their “quarry” and bring them back like trophies for Scientology.

He listed the following people of that era as suitable prey: Edward R. Murrow, Marlene Dietrich, Ernest Hemingway, Howard Hughes, Greta Garbo, Walt Disney, Henry Luce, Billy Graham, Groucho Marx and others of similar stature.

“If you bring one of them home you will get a small plaque as a reward,” Hubbard wrote in a Scientology magazine more than three decades ago.

Although the effort died, the idea of using celebrities to promote and defend Scientology survived — though perhaps not as grandly as Hubbard had dreamed.

Today, the church’s most famous celebrity is actor John Travolta, who credits Hubbard’s teachings with giving him confidence and direction.

“All I’ve had are benefits,” said Travolta, a church member since 1975.

Another Scientology celebrity is actress Kirstie Alley, co-star of the television series “Cheers.” Last year, Alley and Travolta teamed up in the blockbuster comedy film, “Look Who’s Talking.”

Alley is international spokeswoman for the Scientology movement’s controversial new drug and alcohol treatment center in Chilocco, Okla., which employs a rehabilitation regimen created years ago by Hubbard.

A former cocaine abuser, Alley has said she discovered Hubbard’s Narconon program in 1979 and that it “salvaged my life and began my acting career.”

Alley also has become active in disseminating a new 47-page booklet on ways to preserve the environment. The booklet, entitled “Cry Out,” was named after a Hubbard song and was produced by Author Services Inc., his literary agency. Author Services is controlled by influential Scientologists.

In April, Alley provided nationwide exposure for the illustrated booklet — which mentions Hubbard but not Scientology — when she unveiled it on the popular Arsenio Hall Show. Since then, it has been distributed to prominent environmental groups throughout the U.S.

Besides Alley and Travolta, the Scientology celebrity ranks also include: jazz pianist Chick Corea; singer Al Jarreau; actress Karen Black; opera star Julia Migenes; Priscilla Presley and her daughter Lisa Marie Presley, and Nancy Cartwright, who is the voice behind Bart Simpson, the wisecracking son on the animated TV hit, “The Simpsons.”

U.S. Olympic gymnast Charles Lakes also is a prominent Scientologist.

After the 1988 Summer Games in Seoul, Lakes appeared on the cover of Celebrity magazine, a Scientology publication that promotes church celebrities. In an interview with the magazine, Lakes credited Dianetics for his success and strength.

“I am by far the healthiest person on the team,” he said. “They (other team members) are actually resentful of me because I don’t have to train as long as they do.”

Celebrities are considered so important to the movement’s expansion that the church created a special office to guide their careers and ensure their “correct utilization” for Scientology.

The church has a special branch that ministers to prominent individuals, providing them with first-class treatment. Its headquarters, called Celebrity Centre International, is housed in a magnificent old turreted mansion on Franklin Avenue, overlooking the Hollywood Freeway.

In 1988, the movement tried to associate itself with a non-Scientology celebrity, race driver Mario Andretti, by sponsoring his car in the GTE World Challenge of Tampa, Fla. But the plan backfired.

When Andretti saw seven Dianetics logo decals stripped across his Porsche, he demanded that they be removed.

“It’s not something I believe in, so I don’t want to make it appear like I’m endorsing it,” he was quoted as saying.

For years, Scientology’s biggest celebrity spokesman was former San Francisco 49ers quarterback John Brodie.

Brodie said that when pain in his throwing arm threatened his career, he applied Dianetics techniques and soon was “zipping the ball” again like a young man.

Although he still admires Hubbard’s teachings, Brodie said he gave up promoting them after some of his friends in Scientology were expelled and harassed during a power struggle with church management.

“There were many in the church I felt were treated unfairly,” Brodie said.

Part 2: The Selling of a Church

The Courting of Celebrities

Testimonials of the famous are prominent in the church’s push for acceptability. John Travolta and Kirstie Alley are the current headliners.

(Monday, 25 June 1990, page A18:5)


The Church of Scientology uses celebrity spokesmen to endorse L. Ron Hubbard’s teachings and give Scientology greater acceptability in mainstream America.

As far back as 1955, Hubbard recognized the value of famous people to his fledgling, off-beat church when he inaugurated “Project Celebrity.” According to Hubbard, Scientologists should target prominent individuals as their “quarry” and bring them back like trophies for Scientology.

He listed the following people of that era as suitable prey: Edward R. Murrow, Marlene Dietrich, Ernest Hemingway, Howard Hughes, Greta Garbo, Walt Disney, Henry Luce, Billy Graham, Groucho Marx and others of similar stature.

“If you bring one of them home you will get a small plaque as a reward,” Hubbard wrote in a Scientology magazine more than three decades ago.

Although the effort died, the idea of using celebrities to promote and defend Scientology survived — though perhaps not as grandly as Hubbard had dreamed.

Today, the church’s most famous celebrity is actor John Travolta, who credits Hubbard’s teachings with giving him confidence and direction.

“All I’ve had are benefits,” said Travolta, a church member since 1975.

Another Scientology celebrity is actress Kirstie Alley, co-star of the television series “Cheers.” Last year, Alley and Travolta teamed up in the blockbuster comedy film, “Look Who’s Talking.”

Alley is international spokeswoman for the Scientology movement’s controversial new drug and alcohol treatment center in Chilocco, Okla., which employs a rehabilitation regimen created years ago by Hubbard.

A former cocaine abuser, Alley has said she discovered Hubbard’s Narconon program in 1979 and that it “salvaged my life and began my acting career.”

Alley also has become active in disseminating a new 47-page booklet on ways to preserve the environment. The booklet, entitled “Cry Out,” was named after a Hubbard song and was produced by Author Services Inc., his literary agency. Author Services is controlled by influential Scientologists.

In April, Alley provided nationwide exposure for the illustrated booklet — which mentions Hubbard but not Scientology — when she unveiled it on the popular Arsenio Hall Show. Since then, it has been distributed to prominent environmental groups throughout the U.S.

Besides Alley and Travolta, the Scientology celebrity ranks also include: jazz pianist Chick Corea; singer Al Jarreau; actress Karen Black; opera star Julia Migenes; Priscilla Presley and her daughter Lisa Marie Presley, and Nancy Cartwright, who is the voice behind Bart Simpson, the wisecracking son on the animated TV hit, “The Simpsons.”

U.S. Olympic gymnast Charles Lakes also is a prominent Scientologist.

After the 1988 Summer Games in Seoul, Lakes appeared on the cover of Celebrity magazine, a Scientology publication that promotes church celebrities. In an interview with the magazine, Lakes credited Dianetics for his success and strength.

“I am by far the healthiest person on the team,” he said. “They (other team members) are actually resentful of me because I don’t have to train as long as they do.”

Celebrities are considered so important to the movement’s expansion that the church created a special office to guide their careers and ensure their “correct utilization” for Scientology.

The church has a special branch that ministers to prominent individuals, providing them with first-class treatment. Its headquarters, called Celebrity Centre International, is housed in a magnificent old turreted mansion on Franklin Avenue, overlooking the Hollywood Freeway.

In 1988, the movement tried to associate itself with a non-Scientology celebrity, race driver Mario Andretti, by sponsoring his car in the GTE World Challenge of Tampa, Fla. But the plan backfired.

When Andretti saw seven Dianetics logo decals stripped across his Porsche, he demanded that they be removed.

“It’s not something I believe in, so I don’t want to make it appear like I’m endorsing it,” he was quoted as saying.

For years, Scientology’s biggest celebrity spokesman was former San Francisco 49ers quarterback John Brodie.

Brodie said that when pain in his throwing arm threatened his career, he applied Dianetics techniques and soon was “zipping the ball” again like a young man.

Although he still admires Hubbard’s teachings, Brodie said he gave up promoting them after some of his friends in Scientology were expelled and harassed during a power struggle with church management.

“There were many in the church I felt were treated unfairly,” Brodie said.

L Ron Hubbard
Lafayette Ronald Hubbard.

Scientologist Ex Nathan Rich about Scientology

Frequently Asked Questions

Over the years I’ve been asked many questions. Some of them frequently come up and so I’ve listed them here. To submit another question please contact me directly. Many of these questions will be answered more thoroughly in my upcoming book.   (Ed. Scythe Tleppo)

Are you an anti-Scientologist?

I am a former Scientologist. I’m not against the beliefs of any Scientologist and I recognize and fully respect their right to believe anything they choose. I am against lying and deceit that the Scientology corporation and its followers use to obfuscate their intentions and beliefs. I am against abuses and tax-exempt status for abusive organizations. Tax-exemption is support from the government and is deserved only in cases where abuse is not a core feature. Disconnecting families is abuse. I don’t sit around all day thinking about Scientology. I am not “going after” Scientology or Scientologists. I simply work to expose my experience and disallow misinformation around me when it comes to subjects, I have experience with. One of those subjects happens to be Scientology.

Do you have faith now? Are you a Christian?

When I got out of Scientology, I was still a Scientologist in the way that I viewed life and thought about reality. Over many years my viewpoints shifted to be less and less aligned with Scientology. I no longer consider myself a Scientologist in thought or belief. However, I do still hold some very basic ideas as “likely” which are entirely faith-based. I personally believe there is something behind the physical reality which is not physical. I personally believe we are more than the physical sum of our parts. I accept that these are not evidence-backed beliefs. The only dangers I have detected in having these beliefs is that I sometimes find myself more passive in life, believing somehow I have much more time than this life. I am trying to work on this issue.

I strongly feel that the specifics of Christianity, along with every other religion, are quite obviously factually incorrect. I think the value of religions is real. I think the underlying messages have merit: I do believe there is more to life than we can understand. And to me, religion is the attempt of humans to articulate that feeling. And unlike several people I admire, like Sam Harris, I do believe the underlying truth is represented there.

How did you break the indoctrination of Scientology?

I never set out to break the indoctrination of Scientology. As I grew up, I by default believed Scientology. There were always little strange inconsistencies and things that didn’t sit right in my mind but overall I believed it was true. I just didn’t care about the truth in the same way others did. I didn’t care if Scientology was the only way to help the planet and save all our souls and so on… I just wanted to be a kid and live my life. By the time I was out of Scientology, I was already indoctrinated to the deepest levels possible. I believed I was a Thetan. I believed Scientology was all true. I believed in aliens and the entire history laid out by Lafayette Hubbard. Again, I just didn’t care.

I lived on the streets homeless for many years. As I continued my drug abuse that started at the Mace-Kingsley Ranch, I mostly ignored Scientology as a study, and took to observing things for myself. I did not seek out anti-Scientology people or information. I did not seek out counseling or any kind of assistance with understanding the nature of reality or myself.

The break was very, very gradual for me. One of the first things that shook parts of the edges of belief for me was when I started understanding what Scientology words meant in the normal world. “Invalidate,” for example, in Scientology is more similar in meaning to “make fun of” or “insult.” When I realized that “invalidate” actually means to successfully negate something, or to show something as actually untrue, a seed was planted. “Postulate” is a word in Scientology that means to actually create some reality by using intention alone. It’s commonly used in a similar way as “hope something will happen,” but in fact we believed if you postulated strong enough, that thing would actually happen. As I learned that to “postulate” something actually means to assert something as being true, the edges broke a little further. Ironically, by learning the actual words in English, I was in effect “clearing” my misunderstood words; the misunderstood words Scientology itself introduced me to.

These small cracks widened and grew deeper as other things I had always observed to not be true became more glaring. Learning that in fact almost no one had ever heard of Scientology when I got out in 1999, I realized something was wrong with the message of worldwide dissemination Scientology was putting out. Over the years I found again and again smart people. Smart, successful people. None of these people believed in Scientology and yet they were so successful. I examined my family and looked for signs of superhuman achievement and success. I didn’t find any.

As I slowly pulled myself out of the horrible life of homelessness I became more industrious, working any job I could get. I realized my family never enjoyed working and was constantly trying out the latest “get rich quick” pyramid scheme or low-labor job. It became a thorn in my mental side. Why were they so insistent on doing as little work as possible? Why were they so lazy? Something was wrong.

There were many, many other small indicators like these. And over time as I thought about the depths of life and reality, each thing I thought I knew slowly fell apart. There was no single realization that Scientology was wrong. It was a slow cracking and breaking.

Continues – part two ..

More Nathan Rich Scientology Dianetics

Nathan Rich about New York Times lies China Healthcare

Nathan Rich Scientology Scythe Tleppo

 

Scientologist ex Nathan Rich about Scientology

How do people get duped by Scientology?

… Continued from part one

It’s a bit off for me to explain, as I was actually born into it. But from what I’ve personally observed, the formula for a good candidate to join Scientology includes someone who has good intentions and is smart. There aren’t bad people going into Scientology. They are people who see the problems of Earth and want to help. They feel like the progress we’re making as a race is too slow or neutral. They are smart enough to have some feelings about reality being something that can be improved. But an important piece of this puzzle is that they must also have very little experience with critical thinking. People who understand computers or science are almost never finding themselves interested in Scientology as a source of truth. That is because these people are looking for evidence and real science, things that Scientology is patently against.

L-Ron-Hubbard-S-sense

Are Scientologists bad people?

No, probably not. Scientologists lie and cheat and steal and break laws, but they do so because they view themselves as serving a higher dynamic of life. They believe that the individual, the family and groups are all less important than the human race itself, and they believe they are the only salvation for the human race. They really do believe that almost no amount of illegal activity or immoral activity is too much, if it means the protection of or enhancement of Scientology.

Did you get paid to appear on Leah Remini: Scientology and the Aftermath?

I spent a lot of my own personal money to fly across the world into Los Angeles to shoot the episode I appeared in. I was not offered any money or lodging. I told the producers upfront that I wouldn’t accept any kind of payment of any kind, for any part of my experience. I wanted to do this entirely to get the truth out and let people hear part of my story. The production crew gave me a T-shirt. I left my own T-shirt behind to repay them. I don’t care about money: I was homeless for seven years. I don’t need money. I care about getting my story out. I need to get my story out.

What is your book about?

I’ve written a book about the first few decades of my life. It focuses on my experiences growing up, how I viewed the world and what it was like to be me. It’s not a sad story, but it’s my story, which can be viewed as sad by some. My life involved Scientology, homelessness, disconnection, drugs and redemption. I hope to inspire people to push past what they think are hard problems in their lives. I hope to share my experience with the world. I want everyone who has ever had dreams to read and get something from my story.

Do you still do drugs?

I generally do not drink alcohol, except on occasion. I do not enjoy smoking weed and was not ever a major pothead, and so I generally avoid it. I have no urges for any other drugs but I do not have a strict policy of behavior about not taking drugs; it’s simply that I’m not interested anymore. So, the short answer is that I don’t do drugs, although I also do not go around trying to get people to stop doing drugs. I can only share what my experiences were like and allow others to come to their own conclusions about what they decide to do with their destinies. I believe that the more people share their stories of how they were able to get out of the depths of drug abuse, the more those people taking drugs will have the confidence and process available to make appropriate changes to their own lives.

How did you break your addiction to drugs?

I didn’t set out to stop being addicted to drugs. My first love in drugs was LSD. The next one was methamphetamine, and the last was heroin. Each one of these started taking its toll on my mind and body. LSD slowly lost its luster as I realized I had really reached the end goal of use and could not have a meaningful new trip without upping my dose to past 25 hits. But by then I already felt like I “got” reality when it comes to LSD. I didn’t feel like there was much more to gain there. I moved on to methamphetamine, which was very addictive. It was the hardest of the drugs to kick for me. I had a little help from a friend, who isolated me in a basement during a total mental breakdown I had. Eventually I found the high-energy and high-intensity of speed too overwhelming. It became less about euphoria and more about being hyper and energetic. During my enormous comedowns from speed someone recommended heroin to ease the transition from high to sober. And in a way they were spot on. Heroin broke the horrible come down that speed brought. And soon enough I moved on to heroin.

Heroin killed me a few times. I died and was just barely kept alive, thankfully, by friends of mine in all cases. Heroin is a much simpler drug than methamphetamine or LSD: it just makes you feel good. Or at least, that’s the beginning stages of it. Eventually heroin makes you feel normal and lack of heroin makes you feel horrible. It was during one of these long stints of being strung out that I hitchhiked to a state I knew heroin was hard to get in. I had no connections and no more of a mental strong will to continue. I drank alcohol to take some of the edge off, but ultimately it came down to a choice: die again, or try something new. I decided to try something new.

What is your relationship with your family like now?

My family situation is complicated. My mother’s side of the family was and is completely comprised of Scientologists. As soon as I came out in public exposing the child abuse I experienced as a child, nearly everyone on this side of the family came out attacking me personally with strange lies and intentionally misleading information. I thought it was quite revealing, as I never mentioned any of them in the video, out of respect. Since they have come out as child abuse protectors and anti-victims, I have lost respect for them and no longer try to hide their identities or protect their privacy, as they themselves have entered the public arena. My mother’s side of the family is completely disconnected from me and have been since I was underage. Other than the two times they randomly showed up in my life to try to get me back into Scientology and/or to not write a book, they have acted as if I never existed.

My father and his side of the family were disconnected from when I was around 5 years old. I have reconnected with a few of them over the years but there isn’t a strong bond, as we actually don’t know each other. They are really nice people and are not Scientologists.

In short, most of my life I’ve had no family at all. And the effects of that are clear to me when I am around other people and their families. It’s not fun for me. But I soldier on.

What are your politics?

I have always been what you would call the left. I was a punk rocker, against the system and against pretty much everything else too. In more recent years I’ve found myself more center and now I consider myself slightly right of center. In general I would say I’m an independent.

Are you a Suppressive Person?

Many times in my life I thought I was an SP. I remember finding out that an SP never thinks he is an SP and finding relief that I couldn’t be one, because I had thought I was one. These days, I don’t even believe that SPs exist, in the Scientology way. If they did exist, I would not consider myself one of them. I don’t feel threatened by others’ success or enlightenment. In fact, I want people to get better. I want to get better. I want us all to heal. Does that sound suppressive to you?

Nathan Rich

Nathan Rich story

Hotpot team

Nathan Rich author of Scythe Tleppo and content creator in team Hotpot 火锅大王.

Commander Snake in LRon Hubbard Scientology

Hagiography

And how Scientology advocates Commander Snake Joseph C Thompson in L Ron Hubbard Hagiographa seems sometimes apparent odd.

Commander Snake Thompson was important

Hubbard never seems to give positive credit to anyone, (but plenty of negative credits to many) so Commander Snake Joseph Thompson is one of the very few.

 

Razor Sharp in Cross examination of the court

Scientology seems to have parts of Commander snake into the Hagiography of L Ron Hubbard to. And the Wikipedia article about Dr Thompson is just so filled with citations from thriller literature and friends who comment their friend.

His knowledge of whatever subject he might be interested in was so detailed and his mind as sharp as a razor’s edge, he would have been a most able cross-examiner in court

Ok, Commander Snake Joseph Thompson was engaged by layers in some high prolific court cases for a while and here theory meets practice,

Fukunaga myles

One of the high-profile cases that Commander Thompson was engaged in was at the end of his military carrier as highest medical officer in Pearl Harbor Hawaii.

The other spiced with heavily undertones …

Anyone detected any star quality of the defense team expert? Was the Judge impressed?

Was Myles Fukunaga satisfied with the defense?

But in the first high profile case and one of the very few known cases where acts and actions from Commander Snake Thompson a part of the outcome in a court have been, it ended with the fact that his client Myles Fukunaga Died by hanging.

Is that the razor-sharp skills that the Wikipedia text implies? Or how should Dr Thompson skills be interpreted with so little-known case to judge the realism from?

The Massie Trial

Honor Killing and slurring out the racism

Dr Joseph C Thompson

Commander snake Thompson did not have the opportunity to get deeper into this,

Commander Snake Thompson Massie trial

Looking into the court actions of Joseph Cheesman Thompson our snake commander does not really reveal he razor sharp mind that is written about in Wikipedia or in the L Ron Hubbard Scientology with its hagiography.

Having investigated some of the whereabouts of Joseph Cheesman Thompson I seems that some of his features are exaggerated rather than from reality

The world is so stupid that it forgets the old ancient wisdom but L Ron Hubbard traveling around in Asia as a little lad and helping the natives according the hagiography. Most important seems to show that one of the few that ever receive positive credit from Hubbard also is super-fantastic in all the ways possible.

With a Razor-sharp mind. that presumably could unearth new old archeological possibilities in the cross examinations of the court as well as digging so deep until they passed the first archeology that kept on digging while we were digging the digit and finalized the statistics of it all in a major homerun in the universe before the next inevitably big bang.

Or was L Ron Hubbard’s teacher an unusual man that had many shortcomings and his clients in the most known case did hang, blown away from this life in a razor-sharp edge of pristine reality?

In the other known case, did he not go further since the “insanity defense” have gained a substantial bad reputation and success in that time.

The racist slurry of the “Massie trial” with lies and Racial defense teams does not remind me of a razor-sharp defense team. Commander Snake Joseph Thompson in the action of defending Myles Fukuyama ended with Myles Fukuyama Dead from hanging.

Is “a Brilliant mind with a razor sharp ….in cross examination of the court” a proper description?

 

 

L Ron Hubbard Scientology God by Proxy as Celebrity

The masters of Mail order occultism

AMORC or the Ancient and Mystical Order Rosæ Crucis (AMORC), also known as the Rosicrucian Order,

That once upon the time filled some magazines with so much advertisements that some columnist wrote: About the mail order magicians and the mail order occultism that seems to be so dependent on adds that he feared that if they stopped some magazines would go bankrupt.

Early in life L Ron Hubbard was a member of the Mail Order occultism AMORC Ancient and Mystical Order Rosæ Crucis A.M.O.R.C, also known as the Rosicrucian Order, Ancient order of Rosencrantz. It is here Suggested that Elron took more from AMORC Than the known thefts of their Spaced-out Xenu that he learned about in his second initiation as a neophyte.

-The importance of the Celebrity as God by Proxy – Many of the big celebs are there – the common features they share are that they are too dead to protest against the description and the membership.

-Benjamin Franklin

-Isak Newton

-Francis Bacon

-René Descartes

Just to mention a few of the celebs in AMORC – Big Eternal Celebes brings in smaller wannabe, as the cardinal-syndrome to the Pope and Gods representative offices in human value.

And most probably it was these celebs that once catch the young L Ron Hubbard to become a member in AMORC. The Celebrities & all the dead celebs.

Lafayette Ronald Hubbard

and a member before he really had the age to legally become a member.

L Ron Hubbard

Stealing the secrets from the AMORC and looking at himself, L Ron Hubbard also realized that he had done that only after discussing his case with others outside of the order. And here he learned what to keep the dropouts in.

But I guess most can recognize some features and signs of Scientology PR from AMORC and it is more than Xenu, it is Hubbard’s first experiences into the road he later baptizes as Scientology from his experience starting in this blueprint of life among all the mystics of unknown Pyramids and mastery.

-The Science Museum of Mail Order occultism

-Super Powers of mind Readings

-To get using the hidden powers we all have

-Telepathic power & power to change from distance

Releasing the bonds that keeps our natural power

Just like the old masters

Defined by the one who wrote the laws of nature and the one on the monetary exchange we all share – the face on the dollar bill – the name on the credit cards meta values. You on Eternal Credit Card togheter with the celebs.

By having or pretending to have the big ones of the celebrities as members the probability of catching the new celebrities increases, this is lesson number one, and it worked out even to the masters of mail order occultism.

This HIGHTLIGHTED PR

-IS Highly confidential, personal and strictly Private – At the same time share universal celebrity powers combined with the order don’t share the facts of your case.

Truth knows no boundaries, but you must pay to receive the free lessons and have the right age. Read the PDF and the personal discrete confidence by the mail order occultism masters in somewhat paradoxical expressive. Dead Celebs follows the order.

IF L Ron Hubbard tried to help himself with his own methods and founded Scientology as the remains of all the things he has tried, AMORC make sense way beyond Xenu.

Volney G Mathison

Volney G Mathison was another person into the early Dianetics and Scientology that have experiences from the masters of mail order magics AMORC. Mathison probably also noted that Hubbard gives credit to persons and events just like AMORC – the already dead and unreachable ones. Image belov from (L Ron Hubbard Mathison Electropsychometer Volney G Mathison M)

The other lane of credit is on the bad account, Hubbard’s reactive mind points out his hyper-reactive action and re-baptize them to Potential Trouble Sources and Suppressive Persons. In REACTIVE ACTIONS Scientology are unprecedented in its actions against SP and PTS and its way to relabel and re baptize the natural resistance.

The Holy Cow and the Parade ox – anomalies in any traffic accidents

No wonder what happens next would be strange`?

REPEATING ORDER OF OBEY

THIS DANCE

-Dervish Their wish in your pray-

Learning the mail orders of feeding directions all the way

Remember and never forget Dianetics the Science of Mental health is only for the healthy ones. The able ones!

The mentally sick is already tried out, it is harder to take from a sick one and make them believe they have gained from it. And L Ron Hubbard early lies and promises about how many percent of the diseases they could fix became too costly.

The Other Celeb: Death & Living Death Disconnection

-You are dead to me-

Revitalizing the cross-cultural most well known celebrity

Disconnection is offered already from the start. From reality, then the rest comes easier. Dead is one of the greatest cross-cultural celebrities. And the celebs we have the smallest knowledge of and the future to us all. by offering the eternal you can manage to make some really sell of their potential in this life. And pay in this life seems to be the shit. So, enjoy it.

I am just locking the future in my car & cargo culture and pretend it was just to help other – Judo you know, and to get a grip in G. (December 1950)

I am just helping my senseless wife by letting the world know about how she locked our baby into my car.  Hubbard always gives credit to others and this is the bad credit he so often share, from the dianetic & Scientology basis Lrons reactive mind. Btw This is how you can lock a baby into your car and being helpful, any other is SP & PTS.

Celebrity as God by Proxy – to fit the description of portable document format – Assembling some old signs and letting you face the most unknown celebrity the Death as well as the well known ones.

Page from the most well known celebrity’s book. The book of dead.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commander Snake Thompson s Father Statements

At the American Consulate Nagasaki, Japan

I, Thomas Jackson Thompson, do solemnly swear that I was born at Foston, Lincolnshire, England, August 15, 1843;

Thomas Jackson Thompson about Lizzie Cheesman and Joseph Cheesman Thompson
Thomas Jackson Thompson about Lizzie Cheesman and Joseph Cheesman Thompson – His Family

That my father, Pierre J. Thompson, emigrated to the United States and settled at Rutland, Vermont, in the year 1858, and thereafter removed to Greenbush, Rensselaer county, New York, in either the year 1862 or 1863, where, to the best of my information and belief, he was naturalized as a citizen of the United States, and where he continued to reside until death in the year 1873, and  during Which time I know he exercised the right of suffrage that in the year 1860 I vent to Rutland, Vermont  and resided with my father until departure to Greenbush and I thereafter remained Rutland In school until the year 1866, When I Went Kenyon College, Ohio; that in the year 1869 I rejoined my father at Greenbush, New York, and studied medicine at the neighboring Albany Medical College the year 1871, when I went to reside in New York City and on Staten Island and there resided continuously the year 1901;

that from the year 1872 to the year 1879 I held the position of Deputy Health Officer of the Port of New York: That in the year 1901, my health being broken, I was compelled to seek a change of climate, and came to Nagasaki, Japan, where,  finding climatic conditions suited to malady (anemia and nervous disorder) I have since resided; that I am convinced that a speedy return to my former home and occupation would seriously endanger my health, not quickly being followed by a fatal result; that since the naturalization’s  of my father I have continued to believe myself to be a citizen of the United States and have exercised the

the rights and privileges Of Such Citizenship; that it is my intention to return to the United States When my health Will permit me to do so; that. I Was married to Lizzie Cheesman, a native-born citizen Of the United States, at Greenbush, Rensselaer County, New York, in the year 1873, Whom I have two sons, born in the United States, the elder of whom Joseph Cheesman Thompson, is a surgeon on United State e Navy and now on duty on the U.S.S. “Chattanooga”:  that ever since my first arrival in the  United States I have always borne true faith and allegiance  to the Constitution and laws of the United States  and, further I do solemnly swear that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States, against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith  and allegiance to the same; and that I take this obligation freely. Without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion: So help me God.

Thomas Jackson Thompson

Thomas Jackson Thompson

Sworn to and subscribed before me this twelfth day Of

November, 1907.
Consul.

Dr Thomas Jackson Thompson

Thomas Jackson Thompson in the U.S., Consular Registration Certificates, 1907 – 1908

Nagasaki Japan

Highashi, Yamati, Nagasaki, Japan

Data referring ID: Lizzie Cheesman, Joseph Cheesman Thompson

Thomas Thompson M.D and Lizzie Thompson Returning from Nagasaki, Japan.

 

Thomas Jackson Thompson M.D.

THOMAS JACKSON THOMPSON
ROSEBANK POST OFFICE, STATEN ISLAND, N. Y.
PHYSICIAN. Born August 15, 1843, in England. Attended high school, Rutland, Vt.; graduated from  Kenyon, 1869, A.B.; also M.D.; member Philomathesian society ; Deputy Health Officer of Port of New York, 1872-’79. Married March 11, 1873, to Lizzie Cheesman. Three sons.

In public interest since Commander Snake Joseph Thompson seems to have been one of the main inspirations of L Ron Hubbard to Dianetics and Scientology. In both Wikipedia and forums there seems to be interests of hagiography as well as ex Scientologists will to believe in something of major importance regardless of what can be shown as verifiable truth. Resulting in a strange picture of reality relying on citations from novels rather than facts.

-Missionary family?
-Childhood in Japan?
And so on … Searching with Google Scholar gives this highly questionable
Commander Snake Thompson Freud

But please, where are the references to all  this..?

Weak Nerves runs in the family seems more likely, does it not?

Victor Kuhne Electropsychometric Reflex

E-Meter Fundamentals from Commander snake Thompson as Dr Victor Kuhne …

Since Commander Snake Joseph Cheesman was such a great inspiration to L Ron Hubbard with Dianetics and Scientology we here show some of the events that might have formed him. The Background, the fairground. Since many other sources seems to be under Scientology Hagiography interests – Or Ex Scientologist trying to have filled their life with at least some meaning, we will might show many pictures and images. not just the vacuum of empty rooms in morphology, that some seems in a

Fact density

That Hubbard wrote Science fiction we all already know.

 

 

 

 

Commander Snake Thompson in love and Crazy War

PR in Black & White
EMilia kalisher thompson artist

Examples from Commander Snake Thompson’s private life

-A marriage that never happens
-One that does occur
Commander Thompson seems to have an ability to captivate the press into his whereabouts. His Sociology of mass impact Pr in wartime is harder to evaluate. But did Crazy Snake Thompson in any way managed the art of marketing management in love and war?

I would say Yes! This is a sample.

But also managed the art of winning and behave in order to so do – Meaning that he might have been very anarchistic in expressions of his behavioral roots of social life and skilled at it. Black and White PR is Wartime action with it’s diplomatic. At first it might appear just like crazy until one realize that there was no known road out of the problem, so a new one has to be invented.

strange crazy notations

Snake quickly internalize a function

it is easy to see how a young L Ron Hubbard could be very inspired by a bragging style Thompson, who had no reason to brag to anyone, but to blow the little sad ones sadness away. And so he did. To me this just indicate an older man blowing a little minds cry far away. With the strengths of his experience he had some to put into it.

With the strengths of Dr. Thompson’s Science expeditions or spy expeditions flagged as science, as well as Dr Thompson’s experiences from starting the Lectures outside the cages of the animals in the San Diego Zoo. He know Caesar the Kodiak bear, for a while he drove Caesar to Zoo in his Automobile every morning and what Hubbard expressed in handling was …
-Aye Aye Copy that Sir!

But there might be a huge difference between just copying a encyclopedic from Piratebay and learning after a while, one eyed vision. After all there is a huge difference between Snake and selling Snake poisons and rattle in the quackery area. A copycat makes not a Siamese.

Learning teachers
Entrepreneur souls last in bone and stone – The XO Skeleton .
Way beyond the Newspapers and the black and white.

Most of all Dr Thompson was a teacher
Married to ladies that also seems to have been teachers. The ability to internalize the functions of nature did show up in many ways from the ability to catch a fish, get that snake. Or simply by transfer, his know-how in a way teacher not always manage to do. Inducing the state of learning, awaken the mind to the nature around.
Wife of Dr Joseph C Thompson
Remember the fish image earlier, Downy Blenny baptized after his Emilia Kalisher, the colorful artist with her landscape in mind. Oops Emilia K Thompson it was.

Downy Blenny is not like the Fang Blenny the venom injecting fish with the painless bite.

Emilia Kalisher Thompon

Sometimes almost invisible, sometimes just strikingly there.

Gobioclinus kalisherae. Named at the request of Dr Thompson, in Honor of Miss Kalisher

Swim with the fishes
And naming them in colored glance. Miss Emilia Kalisher and colorful artist, one of the most well known bachelor women in California and the most well known women artist in San Fransisco.
Pak KWAU MAU
Commander Snake Thompson did not appear to have any problems expressing his appreciation to the beloved ones. Surprise and lift you up is very near every parents action to their child – Hubbard mentioning Thompson, yes it appears so. But not the other way around, even it seems suggested so by interest of the copy-cat.

In China, he becomes close friends with British intelligence officers, Buddhist priests, US Marines and the last remaining magician from the line of Kublai Khan’s court. (1926-1929: Travels in Guam) .  L Ron Hubbard, Scientology Hagiographer.

China, British intelligence, Buddhist priests, US marines? Yes the copycat was clearly inspired. Xerox in G – the gravity of the impact. What else could it be? The lies mirroring what he wanted to be. And then follows in the same pattern. The reactive mind selling freedom from it & relabels his reactivity as the nature of protesting against anyone in opposition to him. They are Suppressive Persons, they are Potential problem sources PTS.

Bragging and lifting you Inverted

Hubbard was delighted and becomes very skilled in using this technique in the most inverted way. This might also in several ways mirror his personality, not just the personality test. He learned part of the art but never seems to get the bigger picture.

Liftining and sinking TECH

Inverted like a clockwork –

Knowing the correct spelling of the word and missing the meaning. The dear near loving lift appears in Hubbard mostly inverted but always starts with a lift, welcome in … Why does Hubbard do like this?Exactly how much have L Ron Hubbard been strictly abusive to what he learned, is hard to say. But to catch anyone in Scientology he always starts with a little lifting first. Without ever forgetting his mother sweet singing voice. And this comes from somewhereThey can't take my dreams by L Ron Hybbard's mother
Auntie came running on the boardwalk With, some old song … ledora sang to me. Hubbard pretends to be juicy. And Hubbard Ron L is as always quick into something else… Don’t question the direction of the flow – Directing Dervish. So he remember his dreams and forget to be awaken.Just like a giant baby, like we all are in the beginning, just concentrated on growing. This in itself might also be an indication of that Commander Thompson never really did know the nature of the little L Ron Hubbard, but was happy to help him higher.
Scientology Map L Ron Hubbard group contributed with some images just to thumb in the picture and get a grip.

Commander Snake Thompson Crazy in love and War

Black and White PR In Love and War

Victor Kühne

Parts from: Commander Joseph Cheesman Thompson – Impact to L Ron Hubbard and Scientology
Love x 2

Joseph A or Joseph C Thompson, spelling varies but the person seems to be the same. An assistant surgeon on warship Mohican in Honolulu.
to marry former miss Ah Fong

The most written about love story in that year in a lot of articles more or less the same. Marrying the daughter to the richest man in Hawaii… and how he felt in love at once. Hmmm.
Surgeon thompson about to wed
Love has no boundaries …
to wed a Honolulu girl
A wedding with A Hutchinson (probably Alice) that never seems to happens …

The Next one Dr Thompson falls in love with is also highly prolific and one of the most well-known bachelor Woman of California.
One of the most well known
She is also the most well known women artist in San Fransisco. The bachelor girl Emilia Kalisher. One of the very high profile ladies in town.

Emilia Kalisher Thompson
Her proud father (Edward Kalisher) announces that a wedding already has happened between his daughter Emilia Kalisher and Dr Joseph Cheesman Thompson. Many where surprised, they thought she was married to art itself. Her father and mother was born in Germany and she have been study in Europa and traveled around a lot in the wide world.

Anyone who wondered about the fish earlier might decipher this skipper in net and working state by her
the most known women artist in San Francisco


Gossip about someone speaking fluently ….. continues

Could Commander Snake Thompson create visibility for himself and his sake, in love and war as living and dead by the art of black and white PR.